Dietary Behaviour Pattern and Physical Activity in Overweight and Obese Egyptian Mothers: Relationships with Their Children's Body Mass Index

  • Nayera E. Hassan Biological Anthropology Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Saneya Wahba Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Inas R. El-Alameey Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Sahar A. El-Masry Biological Anthropology Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Mones M. AbuShady Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Enas R. Abdel Hameed Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Tarek S. Ibrahim Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
  • Samia Boseila Child Health Department, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Giza
Keywords: Overweight and Obese, mothers, Body Mass Index, dietary Behaviour, physical Activity

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obesity and related morbidity increase in Egyptian women and their children. A better understanding of dietary and activity patterns is needed to reduce obesity prevalence.

AIM: The present study aimed to assess dietary patterns and physical activity in Egyptian overweight and obese mothers and to explore its relationships with their children's body mass index (BMI).

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This descriptive case-control study was conducted at the National Research Center. The study included a sample of 64 overweight and obese mothers and 75 children, compared with apparently healthy non-obese mothers and their children of matched age and social class. Tested questionnaires were used to collect information of the studied subjects.

RESULTS: A statistically significantly higher incidence of unemployment, large family size was observed in overweight & obese women compared to controls (P < 0.05). Those women who consumed vegetables more than 3 times a week were less likely to be overweight or obese (P < 0.05). No significant association were detected between mothers' physical activity, dietary behaviour variables and children’s BMI except for consuming beverages with added sugar (95%CI = 0.074-0.985, P<0.05).

CONCLUSION: Improper dietary patterns, nonworking mothers and big family size are associated with obesity among Egyptian women. Emphasis should be given to increasing physical activity and encourage healthier diets among Egyptian mothers and their children.

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Published
2016-09-01
How to Cite
1.
Hassan NE, Wahba S, El-Alameey IR, El-Masry SA, AbuShady MM, Abdel Hameed ER, Ibrahim TS, Boseila S. Dietary Behaviour Pattern and Physical Activity in Overweight and Obese Egyptian Mothers: Relationships with Their Children’s Body Mass Index. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2016Sep.1 [cited 2021Mar.6];4(3):353-8. Available from: https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2016.095
Section
A - Basic Science