The Level Assessment of Extracellular Nucleic Acids in the Blood of Pregnant Women with Chronic Hypertension with Superimposed Preeclampsia

  • Dinara Omertayeva Department of Fundamental Medicine, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Larissa Muravlyova Department of Fundamental Medicine, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Olga Ponomaryova Department of Fundamental Medicine, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Vilen Molotov-Luchanskiy Department of Therapy, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Ryszhan Bakirova Department of Therapy, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Dmitriy Klyuev Department of Fundamental Medicine, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
  • Miras Mugazov Department of Surgical Diseases, National Join-stock Company Karaganda Medical University, Kazakhstan
Keywords: Extracellular nucleic acids, preeclampsia, arterial hypertension

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia, chronic arterial hypertension is one of the causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality.

AIM: The aim of our study was to assess the level of extracellular nucleic acids in red blood cells and blood plasma in pregnant women with severe preeclampsia, severe chronic hypertension, and pregnant women with chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia.

METHODS: A total of 107 pregnant women were examined who were hospitalized at the Regional Clinical Hospital and at the Regional Perinatal Center in Karaganda and 29 healthy non-pregnant women. Pregnant women were divided into four groups: 1 group – 32 pregnant with severe chronic hypertension, 2 group – 48 pregnant women with severe preeclampsia, 3 group – 35 women entered the group with chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia, and group control – 29 healthy non-pregnant women of child bearing age (4th group – control).

RESULTS: The content of ecNA in the erythrocytes of pregnant women with chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia sharply increases relative to the control and comparison groups; in pregnant women with severe hypertension and severe preeclampsia, the level of ecNA is moderately higher relative to the control, but lower than in the main group.

CONCLUSION: Our data indicate significant changes in the level of ecNA in pregnant women with various types of hypertension and require further research, but now, changes in the concentration of ecNA can be considered as one of the links in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Plum Analytics Artifact Widget Block

References

Magee LA, Helewa M, Rey E. Diagnosis, evaluation, and management of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008;30 Suppl 3:S1-2. PMid:18817592

Federal Clinical Guidelines. Diagnosis and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension in Pregnant Women. Mirko: Federal Clinical Guidelines; 2014.

EngenderHealth. Balancing the Scales: Expanding Treatment for Pregnant Women with Life-threatening Hypertensive Conditions in Developing Countries; a Report on Barriers and Solutions to Treat Preeclampsia and Eclampsia. New York: EngenderHealth; 2007.

Venckovskij BM, Zaporozhan VN, Senchuk AY, Skachko BG. Gestosis: Guide fordoctors-M. Med Inform Agents. 2005;1:312.

NICE. Hypertension in Pregnancy, Clinical Guideline. Israel: NICE; 2010.

ACOG Committee on Practice Bulletins--Obstetrics. ACOG Practice Bulletin. Diagnosis and management of preeclampsia and eclampsia. Number 33, January 2002. Obstet Gynecol. 2002;99(1):159-67. https://doi.org/10.1016/ s0029-7844(01)01747-1 PMid:16175681

Norwitz ER, Repke JT. NHLBI National High Blood Pressure Education Program. United States: ACOG; 2009.

Chesley LC, Cooper DW. Genetics of hypertension in pregnancy: Possible single gene control in eclampsia and preclampsia in the descendants of eclamptic women. Br J Obstetgynaecol. 1986;93(9):898-908. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.1986. tb08006.x

Dekker GA, Sibai BM. Etiology and pathogenesis of preclampsia: Current concepts. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1998;179(5):1359. PMid:9822529

Ajlamazyan EK. Gestosis: Theory and Practice. M. Russia: Medpress-Inform; 2008.

Ershova E, Sergeeva V, Klimenko M, Avetisova K, Klimenko P, Kostyuk E, et al. Circulating cell-free DNA concentration and DNase I activity of peripheral blood plasma change in case of pregnancy with intrauterine growth restriction compared to normal pregnancy. Biomed Rep. 2017;7(4):319-24. https://doi. org/10.3892/br.2017.968 PMid:29085628

Wang A, Rana S, Karumanchi SA. Preeclampsia: The role of angiogenic factors in its pathogenesis. Physiology (Bethesda). 2009;24:147-58. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00043.2008 PMid:19509125

Adu-Bonsaffoh K, Antwi A, Gyan B, Obed SA. Endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia in Ghanaian women. BMC Physiol. 2017;17(1):5. https://doi.org/10.1186/ s12899-017-0029-4 PMid:28356151

Pinzani P, Salvianti F, Pazzagli M, Orlando C. Circulating nucleic acids in cancer and pregnancy. Methods. 2010;50(4):302-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2010.02.004 Clinical Sciences Gynecology and Obstetrics 518 https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/index PMid:20146940

Mandel P, Metais P. Les acides nucléiques du plasma sanguin chez l’homme. C R Seances Soc Biol Fil. 1948;142(3-4):241-3. PMid:18875018

Leon SA, Shapiro B, Sklaroff DM, Yaros MJ. Free DNA in the serum of cancer patients and the effect of therapy. Cancer Res. 1977;37(3):646-50. PMid:837366

Swarup V, Rajeswar MR. Circulating (cell-free) nucleic acids--a promising, non-invasive tool for early detection of several human diseases. FEBS Lett. 2007;581(5):795-9. PMid:17289032

Muravlyova L, Molotov-Luchanskyi V, Klyuyev D, Tankibayeva N, Koyikov V. Extracellular nucleic acids: Origin and function. Mod Probl Sci Educ. 2010;2:15-20.

Muravlyova L, Molotov-Luchanskyi V, Bakirova R, Ponomaryova O, Omertayeva D. Red-blood cell-derivated microparticles and oxidative stress intermediates in erythrocytes of pregnant women with preeclampsia and hypertension. Free Radic Biol Med. 2019;139:S10-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j. freeradbiomed.2015.07.129

Frattini M, Balestra D, Verderio P, Gallino G, Leo E, Sozzi G, et al. Reproducibility of a semiquantitative measurement of circulating DNA in plasma from neoplastic patients. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(13):3163-4. https://doi.org/10.1200/jco.2005.05.430 PMid:15860889

Gal S, Fidler C, Lo YM, Taylor M, Han C, Moore J, et al. Quantitation of circulating DNA in the serum of breast cancer patients by real-time PCR. Br J Cancer. 2004;90:1211-5. PMid:15026803

Schwarzenbach H, Pantel K, Kemper B, Beeger C, Otterbach F, Kimmig R, et al. Comparative evaluation of cell-free tumor DNA in blood and disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with primary breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res. 2009;11(5):R71. https://doi.org/10.1186/bcr2404 PMid:19772563

Schwarzenbach H, Alix-Panabiиres C, Mьller I, Letang N, Vendrell JP, Rebillard X, et al. Cell-free tumor DNA in blood plasma as a marker for circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2009;15(3):1032-8. PMid:19188176

Hahn S, Jackson LG, Kolla V, Mahyuddin AP, Choolani M. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal aneuploidies and mendelian disorders: New innovative strategies. Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2009;9(6):613-21. PMid:19732005

Hung EC, Chiu RW, Lo YM. Detection of circulating fetal nucleic acids: A review of methods and applications. J Clin Pathol. 2009;62:308-13.

Chan AK, Chiu RW, Lo D. Cell-free nucleic acids in plasma, serum and urine: A new tool in molecular diagnosis. Ann Clin Biochem. 2003;40(2):122-30.

Tsang JC, Lo YM. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma/serum. Pathology. 2007;39(2):197-207. PMid:17454749

Maron JL, Bianchi DW. Prenatal diagnosis using cell-free nucleic acids in maternal body fluids: A decade of progress. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2007;145C(1):5-17. PMid:17299735

Ng EK, Tsui NB, Lau TK, Leung TN, Chiu RW, Panesar NS, Lit LC, Chan KW, Lo YM. mRNA of placental origin is readily detectable in maternal plasma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003;100(8):4748-53. PMid:12644709

Tsui NB, Chim SS, Chiu RW, Lau TK, Ng EK, Leung TN, et al. Systematic micro-array based identification of placental mRNA in maternal plasma: Towards non-invasive prenatal gene expression profiling. J Med Genet. 2004;41(6):461-97. PMid:15173234

Wong BC, Chiu RW, Tsui NB, Chan KC, Chan LW, Lau TK, et al. Circulating placental RNA in maternal plasma is associated with a preponderance of 5 mRNA fragments: Implications for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and monitoring Clin Chem. 2005;51:1786-95.

Ermakov AV, Konkova MS, Kostyuk SV, Izevskaya VL, Baranova A, Veiko NN. Oxidized extracellular DNA as a stress signal in human cells. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2013;2013:649747. PMid:23533696

Muravlyova L, Molotov-Luchanskyi V, Klyuyev D. Extracellular nucleic acids in the blood of patients with chronic renal failure. Int J Exp Educ. 2014;3(1):75-7.

Markusheva LI, Savina ME, Toguzov RT, Reshina VM. Nuclear chromatin proteins in evaluating the effectiveness of treatment of patients with psoriasis. Clin Lab Diagn. 2000;7:18-20.

Published
2020-04-20
How to Cite
1.
Omertayeva D, Muravlyova L, Ponomaryova O, Molotov-Luchanskiy V, Bakirova R, Klyuev D, Mugazov M. The Level Assessment of Extracellular Nucleic Acids in the Blood of Pregnant Women with Chronic Hypertension with Superimposed Preeclampsia. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2020Apr.20 [cited 2020Oct.31];8(B):514-8. Available from: https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/4180
Section
Gynecology and Obstetrics