Differences of Cardiovascular Risk-based on Atherogenic Index Plasma Dan Framingham Risk Score in Postpartum with Preeclampsia and Normotensive

  • Cinthya Ayu Meritha Siregar Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
  • Makmur Sitepu Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
  • M. Rhiza Z Tala Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
  • Johny Marpaung Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
  • Henry Salim Siregar Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
  • Dwi Faradina Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Sumatera Utara, Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, Indonesia
Keywords: Cardiovascular risk, Atherogenic index plasma, Framingham risk scores, Preeclampsia

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in women worldwide. Preeclampsia may be more than just risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease later in life. Systematic reviews suggested approximately double the risk of ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular incidents, and mortality of cardiovascular disease after preeclampsia.

AIM: The aim of the study was to analyze the differences of cardiovascular risk later in life-based on atherogenic index plasma and Framingham risk score (FRS) in postpartum women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive women.

METHODS: This is study a comparative analytic study with case–control design on 46 subjects, divided by 23 postpartum preeclampsia patients as a case sample subject and 23 postpartum with no history of hypertension as the control group. Subjects were examined for blood pressure, height, weight, and asked to fast for at least 8 h before blood lipid profile and glucose were examined with laboratory methods. Atherogenic index plasma and FRS were measured. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 25. p < 0.05 was considered significant.

RESULTS: Based on the results, the study found significant differences between systolic and diastolic blood pressure in preeclampsia compared to the control group. Median systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the preeclampsia group compared to control group were 180 versus 110 in systolic blood pressure; 100 versus 80 in diastolic blood pressure with p < 0.000. Total cholesterol, low-density lipid, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides levels in preeclampsia were 218.38 ± 23.26 mg/dL, 128.60 ± 22.74 mg/dL, 38.60 ± 5.99 mg/dL, and 252.73 ± 47.16 mg/dL, respectively, with p < 0.05 and non-preeclampsia group were 143.0 ± 16.82 mg/dL, 69.17 ± 23.03 mg/dL, 51.73 ± 8.65 mg/dL, and 121.30 ± 14.65 mg/dL, respectively, with p < 0.05. Differences in plasma atherogenic index values can clearly be observed in the preeclampsia and control groups (p < 0.05). A similar interpretation was found in the FRS (p < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between age and body mass index with atherogenic index plasma and FRS in preeclamptic group.

CONCLUSION: There was a significant difference in atherogenic index plasma and Framingham risk score of postpartum preeclampsia and normotensive women.

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Published
2020-05-20
How to Cite
1.
Siregar CAM, Sitepu M, Tala MRZ, Marpaung J, Siregar HS, Faradina D. Differences of Cardiovascular Risk-based on Atherogenic Index Plasma Dan Framingham Risk Score in Postpartum with Preeclampsia and Normotensive. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2020May20 [cited 2020Oct.29];8(B):389-94. Available from: https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/3663
Section
Gynecology and Obstetrics