Level of Work Related Stress among Teachers in Elementary Schools

  • Teuta Agai–Demjaha Institute of Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia, WHO Collaborating Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Medical Faculty, Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Skopje
  • Jovanka Karadzinska Bislimovska Institute of Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia, WHO Collaborating Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Medical Faculty, Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Skopje
  • Dragan Mijakoski Institute of Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia, WHO Collaborating Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Medical Faculty, Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje, Skopje
Keywords: workplace, stress, teachers, demography, job characteristics

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Teaching is considered a highly stressful occupation, with work-related stress levels among teachers being among the highest compared to other professions. Unfortunately there are very few studies regarding the levels of work-related stress among teachers in the Republic of Macedonia.

AIM: To identify the level of self-perceived work-related stress among teachers in elementary schools and its relationship to gender, age, position in the workplace, the level of education and working experience.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a descriptive-analytical model of a cross-sectional study that involved 300 teachers employed in nine elementary schools.  Evaluation of examined subjects included completion of a specially designed questionnaire.

RESULTS: We found that the majority of interviewed teachers perceive their work-related stress as moderate. The level of work-related stress was significantly high related to the gender, age, position in workplace, as well as working experience (p < 0.01), while it was significant related to level of education (p < 0.05). Significantly greater number of lower-grade teachers perceives the workplace as extremely stressful as compared to the upper-grade teachers (18.5% vs. 5.45%), while the same is true for female respondents as compared to the male ones (15.38% vs. 3.8%). In addition, our results show that teachers with university education significantly more often associate their workplace with stronger stress than their colleagues with high education (13.48% vs. 9.4%). We also found that there is no significant difference of stress levels between new and more experienced teachers.

CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that the majority of interviewed teachers perceived their work-related stress as high or very high. In terms of the relationship between the level of teachers’ stress and certain demographic and job characteristics, according to our results, the level of work-related stress has shown significantly high relation to gender, age, levels of grades taught as well as working experience, and significant relation to the level of education.

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Published
2015-07-01
How to Cite
1.
Agai–DemjahaT, Karadzinska Bislimovska J, Mijakoski D. Level of Work Related Stress among Teachers in Elementary Schools. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2015Jul.1 [cited 2020Nov.26];3(3):484-8. Available from: https://www.id-press.eu/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2015.076
Section
E - Public Health