Vol. 10 No. 1 (2018): Archives of Public Health
Clinical Science

The role of probiotic "Diastop probio" in prevention of Clostridium difficile colonization and infection in hospitalized patients

Elena Trajkovska-Dokic
Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Ss Ciril and Methodius, Republic of Macedonia
Kiril Mihajlov
Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Ss Ciril and Methodius, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
Katja Popovska
Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Ss Ciril and Methodius, Republic of Macedonia
Gordana Mircevska
Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University Ss Ciril and Methodius, Republic of Macedonia
Andrijan Kartalov
University Clinic for traumatic injuries, orthopedics, anesthesia and reanimation, Medical Faculty, University Sts Ciril and Methodius, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia
Biljana Kuzmanovska
University Clinic for traumatic injuries, orthopedics, anesthesia and reanimation, Medical Faculty, University Sts Ciril and Methodius, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

Published 2018-04-30

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile,
  • probiotic,
  • hospitalized patients

How to Cite

1.
Трајковска-Докиќ Е, Михајлов К, Поповска К, Мирчевска Г, Карталов А, Кузмановска Б. The role of probiotic "Diastop probio" in prevention of Clostridium difficile colonization and infection in hospitalized patients. Arch Pub Health [Internet]. 2018 Apr. 30 [cited 2022 Aug. 14];10(1):12-8. Available from: https://www.id-press.eu/aph/article/view/1880

Abstract

Mechanisms for adaptation of microbes from the intestinal microbiome determine their quantitative and qualitative presence in the intestinal tract. One of the most important disturbing factors of the intestinal microbiome, which enable oportunistic bacteria of the gut to reveal their pathogenic properties and cause infections is the antibiotic treatment of infections with different locations. Clostridium difficile infection is a typical example of this kind. The aim of our study was to investigate the possibility of the probiotic Diastop probio in preventing colonization and infection of intestine with Clostridium difficile, in hospitalized patients. Material and methods: A total of 32 patients who were treated with any two of the following antibiotics: Ampicillin, Ceftriaxon, Clindamycin, Ciprofloxacin, Imipenem, Meropenem, Amikacin, were included in the study. Sixteen patients represented the respondent group that received the probiotic "Diastop probio" simultaneously with their antibiotic treatment and the other 16 patients represented the control group who were treated with antibiotics only. Two specimens from each patient were obtained for detection of C.difficile colonization or infection with classical microbiological methods. Qualitative presence of normal intestinal flora was simultaneously analyzed. Results: The percentage of toxigenic  C.difficile strains was three times higher in the respondent group of patients than in the control group of patients (p< 0.05). A significantly lower percentage of disbalance in the normal intestinal flora was registered in patients receiving probiotic simultaneously with their antibiotic treatment. In all patients who had not received probiotics, the normal intestinal flora was reduced or completely absent and in 43.57% of them other pathogenic microorganisms: P. aeruginosa, VRE, ESBL+ E. coli and Candida albicans were detected. Conclusions: The treatment of hospitalised patients with probiotic "Diastop probio" simultaneously with their antimicrobial treatment, contributes to: significant decrease of intestinal flora disturbance, as an important prerequisite for colonization of C. difficile, significant decrease of the frequency of C.difficile infection, which decreases the risk for development of life- threatening complications. Treatment of hospitalized patients with the examined probiotic simultaneously with their antimicrobial treatment should prevent gut colonization with microorganisms, known as causes of hospital infections.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

  1. Vouga M, Greub G. Emerging bacterial pathogens: the past and beyond. Clin Microbiol Infect 2016; 22:12-21.
  2. U. S. Department of health and human services, Center for disease control and prevention: Antibiotic resistance treats in the United States, 2013.
  3. Barbut F, Petit J-C. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated infections. Clin Microbiol Infect 2001;
  4. :405-10.
  5. Beaugerie L, Flahault A, Barbut F, et al. Antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridioum difficile in the community. Aliment Pharmacol Ther
  6. ; 17:905-12.
  7. Kelly CP, Pothoulakis C, LaMont JT.
  8. Clostridium difficile colitis. N Engl J Med 1994; 330:257-62.
  9. Kuijper EJ, Coignard B, Tull P.
  10. Emergence of Clostridium difficile- associated disease in North America and Europe. Clin Microbiol Infect
  11. ; 12:2-18.
  12. Lessa et al. Burden of Clostridium difficile infection in the United States. N Engl J Med 2015; 372:825-34.
  13. Bauer MP, et al. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital based survey. Lancet 2011; 377:63-73.
  14. Vaishnavi C. Established and potential risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection. Indian J Med Microbiol
  15. ; 27:289-300.
  16. Point Prevalence Survey of Hospital acquired infections and antibiotic use in European hospitals; ECDC: 2014.
  17. Silva M, Jacobus NV, et al. Antimicrobial substance from a human Lactobacillus strain. Antimicrob Agents Chemother
  18. ; 31:121-128.
  19. Crobach MJ, Dekkers OM, Wilcox MH, Kuijper EJ. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID): data review and recommendations for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Clin Microbiol Infect 2009; 15:1053-66.
  20. Wilcox MH, Sandoe JA. Probiotics and diarrhoea: data are not widely applicable. BMJ 2007; 335:171.
  21. Thomas MR, Litin SC, et al. Lack of effect of Lactobacillus GG on antibiotic-associated diarrhoea: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Mayo Clin Proc 2001; 76:883-889.
  22. Wenus C, Goll R, et al. Prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea by a fermented probiotic milk drink. Eur J Clin Nutr 2007; (Epub ahead of print,
  23. March 2007).
  24. Hoegenauer C, Hammer H. F, et al.
  25. Meshanisms and management of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Clin Infect Dis 1998; 27:702-10.
  26. Cohen SH, Gerding DN, et al. Clinical practice guidelines for Clostridium difficile infection in adults: 2010 update by the society for healthcare epidemiology of America (SHEA) and the infectious diseases society (IDSA). Infect Cont Hosp Epidemiol 2010; 31:431-55.
  27. Gorbach SL. Probiotics in gastrointes- tinal health. Am J Gastroenterol 2000; 95: S2-4.
  28. McFarland LV. Evidence-based review of probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile infections. Anaerobe 2009; 15:274-80.